Simple Pleasures: Longing, Lust and Love for the Magical Lavender Flower

by - 11:33 AM

 
my love of all things lavender began
the first time I went to a farm where
thick bundles were hanging overhead all across
the open wooden rafters of the open garden shed,
and the scent being exuded from the drying lavender flowers
was heady, intoxicating...  and addictive!
I stood there for quite a while,
enchanted, taking deep breaths
of the amazing fragrance,
while being stunned by the vibrance  
of their glorious purple color.
 
'Magical'...?
For one plant to have so many healing, healthful, aromatic,
 edible and restorative attributes,
and be a drought and disease-resistant plant to grow -
that's 
a bit magical, don't you think?
 
  
 
 
Since Medieval times,
 lavender has been used for many
healing and medicinal purposes,
 in cosmetics, perfumes, soaps, lotions, medicines,
and spas make good use of its refreshing aroma;
its famous fragrance invigorates the mind and soothes the body.
 
Organic dried flowers, buds and essential oils are used 
in cooking too, flavoring everything from
cookies, cakes, pastries, meats and oils to spa waters, teas. and cocktails.  
 
 
 
Lavender eases tension, soothes your body.
Its use in Sachets (small fabric packets of the dried flowers)
are wonderful near your head or under your pillow; 
breath it's scent in to ease tension and help you sleep.
Sachets are great stored with your clothing in drawers and closets, too.
They work double-duty; to scent your delicates, underclothes and clothing,
and also are an excellent repellent to fiber-eating insects,
making them perfect to include in your clothing storage bags as well.
 
 
 
"Ladies fair, I bring to you
lavender with spikes of blue;
sweeter plant was never found
growing on our English ground."

~Caryl Battersby
 

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9 comments

  1. My wife says the scent of lavender calms me.

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  2. and do you agree with her, MikeB? Lavender has a calming effect on most people, including me!

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  3. I am not sure if I agree, but I do like the scent. But my wife is a good observer, so it is probably true.

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  4. MikeB; you know that The Wife always knows! ;-)
    Nice to know we have another lavender fan! I like it best for scenting my clothing, and it's great to keep moths from eating your sweaters.

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  5. Well, your response gives me an idea.

    You know how it goes:
    The wife always knows.

    Whether I'm good or bad,
    She can not be had.

    She'll point out my wrongs
    But enjoy all my songs.

    If I ever forget
    She's already set

    To give a reminder,
    Not meanly, but kinder.

    For this, I adore her
    And hope I won't bore her

    With my silly rambling;
    Now that's really gambling

    With her sweet affection
    Sent in my direction.

    She's a bit of a wonder
    So I must not blunder

    If I am to keep her:
    My dear beauty sleeper.


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    Replies
    1. It's good to see you back in form, MikeB! Thanks very much for you fun Ode To 'She Who Must Be Obeyed'!
      (and I wonder if anyone gets the reference)

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  6. Not sure about the "reference," so I put "She Who Must Be Obeyed" into my search engine.

    Got some web sites selling tee-shirts and mugs with that phrase!

    Also found the Internet Movie Data Base had an entry on a movie entitled SHE, based on "H. Rider Haggard's weird, wondrous story of the beautiful woman bathed in flame and lived 500 years .. at last to find her first love at this very hour!"

    One reviewer summarized the plot. I have deleted most of what he wrote in order to get to the point: "Story of a young man...[and] the lost Kingdom of Kor, where in resides the flame and it's keeper and kingdom ruler, Queen Hash-a-Mo-Tep, or She Who Must Be Obeyed...."

    Is that what you are referring to?

    I have not read any novels by Haggard, but I began A Tale of Two Cities last week and am enjoying it thoroughly (which is saying a lot, because my reading is almost exclusively of non-fiction books).

    Yes, the wife must be obeyed. As I have often said to my wife (partly in jest), "I'll do anything you want, but I won't rob a bank for you."

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  7. The basic reference was indeed to Haggard's "SHE", but mine was so only indirectly. There was an old UK TV comedy show called 'Rompole Of The Bailey' that used to run in U.S. on PBS, and in it Leo Kern played an old lawyer who often referred to his own wife as "She Who Must Be Obeyed" (though never to her face!) It was a running gag, so to speak, and it's popularity at the time explains why the phrase showed up on all the T-shirts and mugs! ...must have been quite a few men who could relate to the old Bailey!

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  8. Speaking of The Old Bailey, I am currently reading A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens. When I moved from one high school to another, the "new" school English class was just finishing reading this book so I never got to read it. I bought an ex-library copy quite a few years ago ago and finally began to read it last month. I am a little over halfway through and am enjoying it immensely. Marvelous writing and a most interesting story, well told. I read non-fiction almost exclusively, although I have read at least two books of fiction in the past 2-3 years and enjoyed them (The Pearl, Around the World in Eighty Days). I decided it was time for another. Glad I did.

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